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The Matrix

Movie Analysis: The Matrix The first Matrix movie was many things to many audiences. It stands out as a story that fuses all contemporary philosophical issues—issues that continue to fascinate us. Yet what stands out in the first Matrix movie are Buddhism, Dystopia, and Fate vs. Free Will, Undoubtedly, the foundation of first Matrix came from Buddhist principles. The idea of living in a lie and then coming out to the real world—one that is filled with misery, poverty and day-to-day survival is similar to how Buddhism came to be. With Buddhism, what many legends have in common was that Buddha was said to be the son of Suddhodana, the head of the Gautama clan and chieftain of Shakya people living at the foot of the Himalayas. Legend has it that Buddha was born with lights glittering in the heavens, accompanied by trees blooming out of season and brief earthquake. Before his birth, a sage predicted that the son of Suddhodana would bear a son who would become a universal monarch or a world teacher (Hein, 1973). Alongside his prophecy, the sage also warned Suddhodana that if Siddhartha, his son, becomes a wanderer, he would meet an old man, a sick man, a corpse and a monk. By witnessing these people, Siddhartha would learn about the other side of life, which was marked by pain. Thus, Suddhodana made sure that he kept his son at home to live a life of luxury. He even chose him his bride, who was a beautiful princess. However, it couldn’t be prevented that Siddhartha would travel to and fro on his country. In some of his journeys, he saw the four men that the sage told him he’d see. Siddhartha then understood what age, sickness, and death meant. Immediately, he realized that his own life of wealth and pleasure was a false picture of reality. From then on, Siddhartha was determined to find a cure to this suffering. He snuck out from his palace one night and became a wandering monk. This event where Siddhartha turned his back to the life of luxury and his worldly life is called the Great (Hein, 1973). Legends then go on describing Siddhartha’s journeys, trying to find the right path on ridding himself of suffering. There are stories where he apprenticed himself from philosophers and holy men who taught him the ascetic life. Soon, he realized the living ascetically offered no insight on the problem of suffering. He then renounced strict practices and turned himself to meditation. In the Matrix, with see a similar plot. By day, Mr. Thomas Anderson works in a small cubicle of an unknown corporate organization. By night, he is a computer hacker going by the name of Neo. Like Siddhartha Buddha, he unknowingly lives in a world that is designed for him. Mr. Anderson/Neo is prevented to see the truth of how they are all controlled and that their real body is contained in a matrix, used as batteries for the machines. Once Neo swallows the red pill given to him by Morpheus, the bitter reality is unveiled. Buddhism started as a reform movement within Hinduism, which was the dominant faith in India. Hinduism and Buddhism shared a common belief that man was continually born and reborn in a cycle of life and death. He could reach salvation and escape this cycle only when he would learn the true nature of man. The difference between the two was the Buddha rejected the leadership of the Hindus. He did not submit himself in a society with a caste system that assigned individuals within a hierarchy, much like how Neo rejected the designed reality of the machines. The caste system was important with Hinduism because they believed that good conduct and discipline are necessary for salvation after many lifetimes. And in Mr. Anderson’s world, there were certain conducts that one shouldn’t do, and agents like Smith made sure, people don’t cross the line. Like Buddha, Morpheus taught Neo that he did not have to submit to the caste system. Morpheus believed that everyone in their present life can save themselves. They can reach salvation if they see past through their egoistic desires. By doing so, they break away from their earthly illusions or the Buddhist concept of maya—they bond man from to the cycle. The second stand-out theme of the movie is the warning of a dystopic future. Utopia has been ingrained in our psyche as a dream for a society of peoples that live together harmoniously and with orderly happiness. In Greek, utopia means “no place” or a “place that does not exist”. Sir Thomas More coined the word in 1516 when he described his version of an ideal state. Everything in More’s Utopia was perfect. There was perfection in the people, in the government, education, health systems, and in the general welfare. Sir Thomas More also described Utopia in stark contrast with the society and civilization of his time. Utopia as a term can also be used pejoratively to describe actual societies where an ideal society is attempted. But because of modern films, the mention of the term Utopia now includes a dark foreboding. For it has also been ingrained in us, through years and years of watching movies, that Utopia devolves into disillusioned state, or dystopia, forcing a system through warped sense of order. All films relating to Dystopia can trace its roots from George Orwell’s Nineteen-Eighty Four, whose protagonist, Winston Smith, is the attribution of The Matrix’s Agent Smith. In the book, Smith is the victim of a totalitarian regime and what becomes of the book is a cautionary tale of what would happen if totalitarian regimes would rise to power. This was the fear that Orwell had and the film delivered on this sentiment. The most famous plot device in Nineteen-Eighty Four is the use of their slogan “Ingsoc”, that does not only indoctrinates the common masses, it also enables the Party to hold on to power by twisting their ideologies: War is peace, freedom is slavery, ignorance is strength (Orwell, 1949) are all twisted social contract whereby masses, especially the proles, agree with the society to protect them from outside threats. In The Matrix, the machines have gone a step further, rather than banner their slogan, they have designed the world that have indoctrinated and incapacitated all people cocooned inside the matrix battery. The indoctrination is so effective, the people no longer knows the difference between what is real and what isn’t. Both worlds—one of traditional dystopia and the other, the Matrix’s virtual realism—play a possibility of losing our minds and ideology against a totalitarianism of either by government institutions or by machines. The stories connect with audiences because, unlike utopian fictions, they can readily relate to their reality. We too are controlled by institutions. We are already controlled by internet time, by Facebook, Twitter, Yahoo, etc. We can cite our dependence on oil and the power that corporations hold over us. We too can fall prey to the abuses and torture of their powers. We too can justify our revolution just as Morpheus justified his. In both stories, people have become too complacent and the stories warn us on our potential inactivity. In some instances, 1984 and The Matrix can be tooled to wake us up. This is why dystopian ideas have become more relevant today than its counterpart. Dystopian societies can happen and if they do, they are not that easy to break apart. It is difficult to escape Nineteen Eighty-Four’s Oceania because the government has indoctrinated every individual. Both films then depict the inescapable nature of man once transformed into something else. The people trapped in The Matrix have a false sense of freedom, integrity, dignity. They have such a Utopia that had man who have completely forgotten how to remain a human being. Morpheus’ mission was to liberate as many people as can, but his prime objective is to find The One, without him, the revolution against the machines would become an impossible one. In this future, the sad fact is that humans inside the machines have surrendered completely—and that is what made their Utopias succeed. People have accepted their state as it is and there is no going forward. Mankind is no longer a human being. They have evolved into a more orderly and stable state. They are enlightened. Why would citizens on those worlds want it any other way? The third theme utilized by The Matrix is the contest between fate and free will. The moment Morpheus presented the blue or the red pill, he was asking Neo to choose whether he would like to be governed by fate or by free will. In a world designed by machines, fate rules. And those who have escaped the matrix and live in an open rebellion, now live in free will. But the belief of Morpheus that Neo is the one is completely a fated ideology, supported by the Oracle. This device plots represents the variety of beliefs we have on our lives. We believe events as determined and fixed. We understand these events as happening because they had to come to past. There was a necessity when they happened the way they did. Such an attitude is called determinism, which dictates that history must be determined by fate alone. If so, a determinist would believe that events of history and of his life are not open, nor is it a product of chance. The past had no other alternative and the future is already been paved its direction. There’s nothing he could do about it. There is no contingency in time. Determinists, like Morpheus and the Oracle, therefore believe in the causality of events—that things take place by some earlier cause. All things are an occurrence of a domino effect. This raises the ire of common sense and, from a philosophical school of thought, of libertarians who believes that man is essentially free. This represents those that do not see causality—this is the appeal of the red pill. They want to live with their choices—albeit it under an impoverished state. The people of Zion fights a revolution so that they would gain their freedom; at the base of it, they are fighting for a life with contingency and that they are not determined by the machines. But with contingency comes moral responsibility—something that determinists can hardly see given their subscription to causality. To Neo’s discovery, the crew of the Morpheus’ ship the Nebuchadnezzar all carries that responsibility to save as many individual as they can. That is their own choice. Although they are all disciples of Morpheus of finding the One, no one else made that choice for them. Everyone chose the red pill, except Cypher, who regretted choosing the red pill and views pleasure, even illusionary pleasure, as the better choice than no pleasure at all. The red pill are widely interpreted as the symbol of free will. The basis of our freedom is that events are contingent and that such uncertainties leave us open to make our own choices. From a practical perspective, this is the common belief of man. That he is free. Yet the argument between Morpheus’ crew and Cypher is all about whether we are essentially free. Common sense tells us that life is contingent and that points to our freedom. Man discovers in himself a power to determine to a certain extent the events of his life. He has the power to influence the success or failure of his work. He has the freedom to determine what type of work he will engage in, who to marry, choose his friends, etc. But what if common sense is already prefabricated within the virtual world, and that we have that sense of freedom and choice inside it—isn’t that freedom itself? What the real world presents, however, is that true freedom is only possible if life is contingent. In the determined world of the matrix, freedom can exist only as an illusion. According to them, we often feel “free”, and that we could do otherwise but these feelings are illusory “and on a higher level, the person acknowledges that even the deliberation is the product of antecedent causes” (Pojman, 2006, 253). Therefore, an individual cannot possibly determine his life if it is all fixed beforehand. Those inside the matrix do not freely choose their actions because their actions are caused by causal processes that form their beliefs and desires. Moreover, their beliefs are truth detectors. But truth is never in their control.


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